Monday, 17 June 2024
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AgricultureEurope

With tractor protests, farmers hope to place Paris “under siege”

  • France‘s interior ministry has ordered a major deployment of security troops surrounding Paris.
  • The two largest farmers’ unions in France will attempt to blockade all main highways leading to the city beginning.
  • Gabriel Attal admitted that farmers face a challenge because their customers demand both lower pricing and higher quality.

Amidst protests against climate activists hurling soup at the Mona Lisa painting at the Louvre Museum, France’s interior ministry has ordered a major deployment of security troops surrounding Paris as farmers threaten to move toward the capital. More pay for their produce, less red tape, and defense against low-cost imports are what French farmers want.

Before any roadblocks were planned around Paris, Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin called a security meeting and gave the order for security officers to stop any blockade of the Rungis International Market and Paris airports, as well as to forbid any farmer convoy from entering the capital.

Tractor protest

The Rungis International Market, which provides a large portion of the fresh food for the city and the surrounding area, is where farmers belonging to the Rural Coordination Union in the Lot-et-Garonne region intend to travel with their tractors.

The two largest farmers unions in France have said that their members who live in the suburbs of Paris will attempt to blockade all main highways leading to the city beginning on Monday afternoon.

The ‘Food Riposte’ movement has demanded that the French government renege on its climate pledges and establish a public health system equal to that of the nation to improve public access to nutritious food and to fairly compensate farmers.

Farmers claimed that the government’s recently announced initiatives, which include “drastically simplifying” some technical procedures and gradually eliminating diesel fuel taxes for farm vehicles, did not adequately answer their requests.

After visiting a farm in the Indre-et-Loire region of central France, Gabriel Attal, the country’s new prime minister, admitted that farmers face a challenge because their customers demand both lower pricing and higher quality.

Additionally, he stated that his administration is thinking about taking further action to stop unfair competition from nations that import food into France but have different production regulations.

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