Monday, 15 July 2024
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EuropeFishing

Fishing season for bluefin tuna opens Sunday – one fish per license holder and vessel per day

  • Catch Limit: One Bluefin tuna per day per license holder and vessel; minimum size 30 kg and 130 cm fork length.
  • Reporting: All catches must be reported and weighed at the North Mole, with after-hours reporting available.
  • Protection Measures: ‘Popping’ for tuna prohibited in Dolphin Protection Zone; immediate reporting of catches and vessel movements required.

The bluefin tuna fishing season starts on June 16th, with anglers limited to catching one fish per day per license holder and vessel. All catches must meet the minimum size requirement of 30 kg and 130 cm fork length.

To protect marine life, towing live specimens to the landing station is strictly prohibited, and ‘popping’ for tuna is banned in the Dolphin Protection Zone north of Rosia Bay.

The new regulations aim to ensure a sustainable season for fishing bluefin tuna

The bluefin tuna fishing season begins on June 16th, allowing anglers to catch one fish per day per license holder and vessel. To ensure sustainability, each catch must weigh at least 30 kg and measure 130 cm in fork length.

All catches must be reported and weighed at the North Mole, operational from 09:00 to 14:30, Monday to Saturday. For catches after 14:30, anglers must contact on-call landing point staff to ensure proper reporting.

Strict regulations prohibit towing live specimens to the landing station, with violations potentially leading to license revocation. Additionally, ‘popping’ for tuna is banned in the Dolphin Protection Zone north of Rosia Bay to prevent harm to dolphins.

Anglers are also required to report any recreational catches of Mediterranean Swordfish and other billfish species, adhering to size regulations for conservation. Vessel movements may be monitored by the Environmental Protection & Research Unit (EPRU) to ensure compliance with these new rules.

These new regulations for the bluefin tuna fishing season emphasize sustainability and the protection of marine life, ensuring that fishing practices are responsible and in compliance with conservation efforts. By adhering to catch limits, reporting requirements, and protective measures, anglers can contribute to the long-term health of the bluefin tuna population and the broader marine ecosystem.

“The new regulations ensure that we balance the enjoyment of fishing with the critical need to protect our marine ecosystems, particularly the vulnerable bluefin tuna and other species in our waters,” said a spokesperson from the Environmental Protection & Research Unit.

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